Personal Growth

Feng Shui Tips for a Patio, Deck, or Balcony

If you live in a city, there’s a good chance that your outdoor space is rather small. However, never fear, there are still some great ways you can Feng Shui your deck, patio, balcony, or porch and turn your small outdoor space into a tiny inviting paradise. Use the practical Feng Shui tips below to get started.

Fix the Energy Flow Between Your Home and Outdoor Space

One of the foundational principles of Feng Shui is that everything has a vital life force that Feng Shui masters call chi, also spelled chi or qi. This includes both living creatures AND inanimate objects, which is, of course, different than most practices originating in Western cultures. Closely related to this Feng Shui foundational principle is another Feng Shui principle that everything is connected through this chi. At home, the chi inside your home is connected to the chi in your outdoor space. In fact, in smaller outdoor spaces just outside our door, like patios, decks, balconies, and porches, we tend to utilize these spaces as extended living quarters so this concept of a connected chi is even more apparent as it will have a greater influence over your life.

In many homes, we accumulate so many material possessions, we start to block the chi flow between the door and our outdoor spaces. We may even be pack rats, saving boxes or other objects we don’t actually need that put a temporary block on the flow of chi. So, one of the most important ways you can Feng Shui your deck or other small outdoor space is to remove these barriers. Now, it’s also important that you don’t allow the positive chi that follows you outside, or flows out when you leave the door open, to simply flow right off your deck, patio, balcony or porch. While you want that positive chi to flow and meander, you also don’t want it simply flooding out. To prevent this, you can place one or two objects, such as outdoor furniture, between the door and a straight line to where the positive chi would escape your deck, patio, balcony, or porch. You’ll want to do this of course without totally blocking the positive chi of course.

Declutter Your Small Outdoor Space

This practical Feng Shui tip is a cousin to the tip above. One of the most common practical and easily achievable Feng Shui tips for the home is to declutter and you can extend that to your outdoor space because it’s all connected. Clutter not only reduces the flow of chi, but clutter also discombobulates chi, sometimes turning otherwise positive chi into negative chi. However, so often when dealing with small spaces we use our outdoor spaces to store stuff until the point they become much too cluttered for chi to flow freely. So, if this is a problem for you, try to downsize (give stuff away if you must) and or organize the possessions you must keep so the positive chi will flow well and stay positive.

Safety Equals Good Feng Shui

To Feng Shui your deck, patio, deck, or porch, it’s important that you remove any potential dangers. If your decking or porch has loose boards, fix them! If you live on a second story, make sure your railings are secure (actually test them). If moss, algae, or mold has made the surface where you or others walk slippery, scrub this away and periodically repeat this procedure. Eliminate sharp corners or soften them in some way. If you have children or pets who like to nibble on plants, make sure you don’t have any seriously toxic plants around! Put up handrails if needed to safely maneuver. Remove or fix any potential trip hazards. Feng Shui teaches us that a safe outdoor area, no matter how humble, will give you great strength.

Celebrate Wind and Water

While there are five elements in Feng Shui, perhaps the most important are wind and water. In fact, the term “Feng Shui” quite literally means “wind-water” in ancient Chinese. This is because the flow of wind and water represents the flow of chi. Fortunately, even the smallest of patios, decks, or balconies can celebrate these two elements by simply adding fun items. Wind chimes, windsocks, weathervanes, pinwheels, whirlygigs, and kinetic sculptures can all be used to both hear and see the wind and celebrate its chi. You can also just blow bubbles off your deck on a windy day 🙂 A small soothing water fountain can be used to celebrate the chi of water. If the placement of an electrical unit would be a challenge in your small space, look for a solar-powered water fountain or a solar water feature.

Potted Plants are Very Feng Shui

Even if you live in an upstairs apartment with a tiny deck or balcony, you can Feng Shui it up by adding greenery and color by adding potted plants, both tabletop, and hanging. Use vine plants to create a peaceful “foliage wall” that will infuse life into you after a long day. Consider growing fragrant herbs like rosemary, thyme, lavender, and sage. These will not only feed your senses but your belly too — and they’re packed with antioxidants! You can also grow other fun edibles in a small space. For example, cherry tomatoes grow well on a deck. In fact, you can even plant them in hanging pots, right along with your potted marigolds, which are also edible and delicious by the way! Flowers always add a nice splash of color and you can pick colors that correspond with one of the five elements to serve as a Feng Shui cure. Plants are vital to Feng Shui energy and you’ll find them very refreshing to your spirit.

Final Thoughts

No matter how small your outdoor space is, you can always find meaningful Feng Shui decorations to personalize your space and make it more welcoming. For example, if you want more joy in your life, you could put Feng Shui butterflies in your potted plants. If you’re wanting to attract more wealth, or perhaps you are hoping for career advancement, you could get a small statue of a three-legged Feng Shui money frog or a Feng Shui dragon. For luck, you could place a Feng Shui dragon turtle, a mystic knot, or a laughing Buddha! Choose whatever Feng Shui decorations speak to you. After all, it’s your Feng Shui outdoor space.

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Danica Jackson

Danica Jackson got her first telescope when she was only nine years old. She's been fascinated with all things celestial ever since. Her studies on history and anthropology give her unique perspectives on astrology and personal growth.

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